Archive for the ‘Heritage Gallery’ Category

Food For Thought Memoirs

Tuesday, November 9th, 2021

Food for Thoughts Memoirs is about generational stories through food, it is not about the ingredients, but different interpretations of the variety of fruits and vegetables shared between the Caribbean, Europe, Indian, China and above all African.  It is about the different ways they are cooked, labelled, and remembered.   It is about memories of yesterday and before, here and now and tomorrow and beyond.

This exhibition will encourage conversation between ages, races and genders because food is one of many things, we have in common other than but not excluding slavery.

From the middle of the 15th to the end of 19th century the Atlantic slave trade brought African slaves to British, Dutch, French, Portuguese and Spanish colonies in the Americas, including the Caribbean.   Their lives contributed to the wealth and development of Europe and after emancipation people travelled from and to the Caribbean Islands.

Traditional African foods brought over to the Caribbean   included okra, black eyed peas, saltfish, ackee, mangos, kidney beans and rice, vegetables and fruits native to the Caribbean such as papaya, yams, guavas and cassava.

Throughout the Caribbean the fusion of African, European Indian/South Asian, Middle Eastern, and Chinese cuisine has influenced different national dishes.    These dishes were brought over to the United Kingdom before and during the Windrush but were adapted due to lack of ingredients available.   Throughout the years the various fruits and vegetables are more readily obtainable and have given not only the Caribbean population the ingredients needed but the whole of the United Kingdom.

The exhibition is curated by the Caribbean Social Forum with support by Professor Tracey Reynolds, Centre Applied Research. With thanks to Dave Hockham, David Waterworth, Shiva and members of the Caribbean Social Forum.

Spatial Materialities

Tuesday, September 28th, 2021

Photograph (detail): Acacia Diana

A solo exhibition of photographic works by Acacia Diana

Spatial Materialities explores spaces and structures through their most fundamental visual language. Images are framed in isolation or in singular perspective, to focus on the aspects that inform user experience with design cues. This collection extends a deeper appreciation for the visual enhancements of architecture, some often overlooked, that aids in informing identities, styles and histories. Certain elements are accentuated in bright, vibrant hues to draw viewers to the essential language of form and arrangement, to awaken child-like curiosity and wonder. The subjects, captured over the span of several years, archive the photographer’s growth and architectural comprehension over the years.

THE PHOTOGRAPHER

Acacia Diana is a photographer and designer who specialises in producing architecture and travel visuals. An enthusiastic advocate of exploring the world, cultures, and environment, she has worked with numerous global brands to create and curate beautiful images. She also does documentary work for international NGOs and refugee aids. She is a Canon EOS Youth Ambassador, and a graduate of Masters in Architecture from the University of Greenwich.

Instagram: @acaciadiana
Website: www.acaciadiana.com


Photography supported by

Temporary Closure

Tuesday, April 7th, 2020

There is currently no exhibition in the Heritage Gallery.

Heritage Gallery Temporary Closure

Tuesday, July 14th, 2020

The Heritage Gallery remains temporarily closed. We are working closely with the University Estates team towards its reopening and will post developments on our social media platforms as these emerge.

Image: Rob Smith “Drift” (2017) – detail, underwater pinhole photograph exhibited in “Granular” Project Space Jan-Feb 2018

Follow University of Greenwich Galleries on TwitterInstagram or Facebook.

In line with our current COVID19 measures, we have devised a new exhibition in the Stephen Lawrence Gallery that you can explore from the large windows facing the street, without needing to enter the building.


Have a question or planning a visit? Check out our contact details and location on the Find us page.

We look forward to welcoming you back soon!